Tag Archives: make poverty history

G8 rallies: Christina’s story

As we wait in anticipation of the big Enough Food for Everyone IF G8 rally on 8 June, Christina Kelling looks back on her experience at a previous mass demonstration: Make Poverty History. Join us on 8 June and help make history >

Christina Kelling works for Medair Sudan, and formerly worked in the CAFOD Campaigns team: “I was raised in a Christian family and from a young age was taught that the two greatest commandments are to love God and to love other people.

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IF campaign launch: The generation that can end hunger

_MG_6404“We can be the generation to end hunger,” announced presenter Lauren Laverne to the chilly crowds at the Enough Food for Everyone IF campaign launch outside Somerset House last night.

Those CAFOD supporters who’d been around at the start of Make Poverty History – or Jubilee 2000 for that matter – could be forgiven for feeling a sense of déjà-vu – haven’t we been here before? Haven’t we been the generation to end poverty – and, you know what, poverty’s still here.

But just because we haven’t achieved all we want to yet, it doesn’t mean that nothing’s changed. In the past 10 years more than 50 million children have started going to school in Sub-Saharan Africa, while deaths from the great killer, measles, have fallen by almost 75 percent.

And during that time new challenges have also come into focus: climate change the most obvious. We can’t stop now.

At the IF launch, I spoke to 19-year-old Julia. For her, this is all new. Enough Food for Everyone IF could be the defining campaign for her generation. Tweeting her 200 or so followers from the launch might seem a small act, but it’s a powerful one nevertheless. She’s part of the generation that can end hunger.

Will you be part of it? Sign up to IF here > Continue reading

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What lit your flame: Adam’s story

What lit your flame?

Make Poverty History in 2005

In the quiet times INGOs are working in the background, bringing about the incremental changes that I hope will one day make life fair for everyone in the world

Adam Hougham (CAFOD Supporter Services Division):

“I remember seeing the Ethiopian Famine unfold on Newsround and thought it was so unfair that people like me were suffering elsewhere. Later, I watched Live Aid (whilst building a house out of Lego) and the year after raised money by running around a park for Sport Aid. At the time it seemed to my 7 year-old mind that we were fixing a problem with fairness in the world. We had lots, ‘they’ didn’t and we needed to balance the equation. I did World Vision’s 24-hour famine a few times and years later we tried again by telling everyone that the new millennium provided a Jubilee opportunity to write off crippling debts in the developing world. We had another go in 2005 by wearing white-bands as part of Make Poverty History.

We hope to make things better – and I think we do, but progress is frustratingly slow and hard fought. It’s mad that soon three decades will have gone by since I saw those images on TV and for many the struggle remains. Some celebrity will notice the anniversary, organise another concert and revive public consciousness to ‘fix the problems’ again, but in the quiet times INGOs are working in the background, bringing about the incremental changes that I hope will one day make life fair for everyone in the world. That’s why I work for CAFOD, to see what I do improving the lives of people who need it – rather than those with a strong share portfolio.”

As we mark our 50th anniversary at CAFOD, it is time to reflect. We are asking all staff, volunteers, supporters and other friends of CAFOD to look back over their lives and recall the moment when they were first drawn into the fight against poverty and injustice. http://www.cafod.org.uk/whatlityourflame

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What lit your flame: James’ story

What lit your flame?

James Buchanan at The Wave

Jesus’ commandment to “Love your neighbour as yourself” challenged me to put my faith into action

James Buchanan (CAFOD Campaigns Team):While in the Sixth Form, a friend invited me to get involved in a campaign against Nestlé’s unethical marketing of breast milk substitutes in developing countries. We were a small team in a big school, but we grew support for the campaign among other students, staff and parents. Eventually the school management agreed to meet us to discuss our concerns and Nestlé even sent their Senior Policy Advisor to the meeting, but we succeeded in convincing the school to switch to an ethical catering company that sold Fairtrade products. This experience convinced me that change is possible even for a small, committed group.

Around this time I went to a People & Planet conference which opened my eyes to the causes of poverty and injustice. At university I met like-minded students who shared my passion for justice; then the Make Poverty History campaign provided the opportunity to involve many others at university and my parish at home. Jesus’ commandment to “Love your neighbour as yourself” challenged me to put my faith into action – and if my neighbour facing poverty and injustice lived thousands of miles away, they were my neighbour as much as the person living next door.”

As we mark our 50th anniversary at CAFOD, it is time to reflect. We are asking all staff, volunteers, supporters and other friends of CAFOD to look back over their lives and recall the moment when they were first drawn into the fight against poverty and injustice. http://www.cafod.org.uk/whatlityourflame

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What lit your flame: Christina’s story

What lit your flame?

Make poverty history 2005

The Make Poverty History rally in Edinburgh 2000

Christina Kelling (Medair Sudan): “I was raised in a Christian family and from a young age was taught that the two greatest commandments are to love God and to love other people.

I grew up to believe that standing side by side with people in poverty and challenging injustice is not a choice but a responsibility as a Christian. I saw the role that the church played in Jubilee 2000 and attended the Make Poverty History rally in Edinburgh, seeing for myself the power that people can have when they work together for good. I continue to believe that we can change the world and see it as part of living out my faith daily – of loving extravagantly and never giving up hope.”

As we mark our 50th anniversary at CAFOD, it is time to reflect. We are asking all staff, volunteers, supporters and other friends of CAFOD to look back over their lives and recall the moment when they were first drawn into the fight against poverty and injustice. http://www.cafod.org.uk/whatlityourflame

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