How to be a sign of hope this summer

The coronavirus pandemic has meant that summer plans have had to change as many events have been cancelled. When you are unable to act as planned, it’s easy to feel like your chance to make a difference has gone. Julia Corcoran, Leadership Development Coordinator at CAFOD, reminds us that, despite lockdown, there are still many ways we can make a difference this summer.

Continue reading “How to be a sign of hope this summer”

Creating a hopeful summer

CAFOD’s Summer of Hope aims to inspire children and young people, and their families, to recreate the events they will miss this summer, to have fun and to raise funds for our Coronavirus Appeal. Kathleen O’Brien describes how the Education team came up with the idea for Summer of Hope after lockdown began and schools closed.

Continue reading “Creating a hopeful summer”

Home heroes provide vital funds for CAFOD’s Coronavirus Appeal

Thousands of people across the UK have been taking part in fun and imaginative ‘2.6 challenges’ to raise vital funds for charities doing invaluable work while the country has been in lockdown.

CAFOD’s incredible community of supporters across England and Wales are making our global response to coronavirus possible.

Continue reading “Home heroes provide vital funds for CAFOD’s Coronavirus Appeal”

What home means to me at Christmas

As we journey towards Christmas, and prepare throughout this season of Advent, we often think about being at home with loved ones. This makes us remember those families who are forced from their homes with nowhere to stay. Moire Harrisson, CAFOD’s Advent Coordinator, talks about the focus of this year’s Advent Appeal.

Continue reading “What home means to me at Christmas”

Speak at Mass this Harvest Fast Day

Lizzie is one of CAFOD’s Step into the Gap alumni. She had a great experience speaking at Mass for Harvest Fast Day, and she hopes you will do the same this year.

Continue reading “Speak at Mass this Harvest Fast Day”

Step into the Gap: Tackling hunger one bowl at a time

Caroline Collins is a Step into the Gap volunteer at Newman University in Birmingham. This week she is getting ready for Family Fast Day.

At Newman University we have been preparing to swap our usual Friday lunch boxes for a simple soup lunch.

CAFOD gap year volunteers 2018/2019
Caroline

For so many of our brothers and sisters around the world, the harvest determines whether their families will go to bed hungry tonight.

For Lilian in Zambia, a good harvest is so important.  It means she can feed herself and her family in the coming months, and sell any extra food to buy school clothes, books and materials to build a home.

Donate to CAFOD’s Fast Day appeal

Continue reading “Step into the Gap: Tackling hunger one bowl at a time”

How reading about honey gave me a sweet fundraising idea

Runa volunteers for CAFOD. She tells us why a CAFOD beekeeping project inspired her to want to fund raise.

I recently helped my niece and nephew bake a honey cake for a bake-off challenge for their charity school fair.  A lot of families attended the event  and  it was a real success. It is great to see supporters looking to have a party-like experience while raising some money, although our cake wasn’t the winning cake (I am still sad about that). I believe creating a fun atmosphere is the key in raising money for CAFOD this summer.

Get ideas from CAFOD’s A-Z of fundraising

Beekeeping project

A training workshop in caring for bees. CAFOD's partner in Nicaragua runs a beekeeping project to give women a source of income. They work in a group to care for hives and bees and are then able to sell the honey produced.
CAFOD’s  beekeeping project.

I was inspired by reading about CAFOD’s overseas projects, and I came across the story of Bharoti. Bharoti lives in a village in Bangladesh with her husband. They are poor parents that led a very hard life and struggled to pay for the basics. CAFOD’s beekeeping project gave Bharoti an alternative way to earn money. The project provides training on bee cultivation and advanced bee keeping techniques. They learn about proper nursing, feeding, treatment, and how to make a new queen cell to grow the bee colony.  It is great to hear Bharoti is now an expert on advanced bee keeping technologies, and she also provides technical support to others in the community.

Stories like Bharoti’s prove how beneficial raising money is to families that need support. CAFOD Beekeeping projects provide an income and can create business opportunities.

The project is a source of hope for women where paid work is hard to come by and working with bees has helped build confidence and self-esteem within their communities. That’s surely motivation to want to do fund raise this summer.

Do you feel inspired by CAFOD Beekeeping project and want to show your support? Organise a fundraising event

Continue reading “How reading about honey gave me a sweet fundraising idea”

Hands On Doutchi: Thanks to you they have hope

Thanks to incredible regular support from CAFOD supporters, life in Doutchi has changed for the better.

Despite the challenges of living on the edge of the Sahara, the Doutchi community have hope.

Hope in the knowledge that they can prepare for the future with confidence.

Knowing that the tools and skills they have gained over the past 3 years, will mean that they can provide for their family now, and well in to the future.

Niger is the world’s poorest country and is also one of the hottest. Getting enough food to eat is the biggest challenge for people living here.

Continue reading “Hands On Doutchi: Thanks to you they have hope”

Hands On Bolivia: You’re helping dreams come true

At the start of your Hands On journey, you met Vladimir. He talked of his desire to provide for his family with good, healthy food.

Thanks to your regular support, and Vladimir’s hard work and determination, he has achieved his dreams.

“When I got involved with Fundacion Nuna, it was as if the door had opened, and I could reach my goals and dreams.”

Our next Hands On project has just begun – find out more and get involved.

The latest news from Vladimir’s neighbours:

Comment below to send your message to the community in Bolivia.

Coping without social media

Georgia, a student at De Montfort University in Leicester, has been on a digital detox for Lent, giving up all forms of social media. She told us how she’s got on with her Give It Up Challenge.

At the time of writing this blog I am 33 days into not using Facebook, Snapchat, Instagram and Twitter. I can’t believe I have come this far- the end is near.

This Lenten challenge has definitely been one of the toughest ones that I have decided to take on. I have found that the most difficult part of the challenge so far is feeling disconnected. The dreaded ‘fear of missing out’ (FOMO) has always been in the back of my mind. I’ve found that I’ve missed Facebook the most- practically anyway. It is hard having to rely on people to relay information you need whether that be for events or notifications from my sports team. I wouldn’t say its my favourite social media app- but the most useful for my everyday life.

The reaction I have had to this challenge has been “are you crazy?”, “what do you do on your phone then?”. I have to admit these were my first thoughts when I began contemplating the idea. I think the most unexpected thing however is that I don’t miss it anywhere near as much as I thought I would. It has just caused minor inconveniences. I definitely haven’t felt like I have been missing out on anything socially like I did before with seeing people’s snapchat and Instagram stories. Because if its not there to see there is no FOMO.  This realization has definitely emphasized how people’s online persona is so different from their reality.

See our favourite Easter prayers

Continue reading “Coping without social media”