Step into the Gap Zimbabwe – living as a child with a disability

Katy Lowrey, one of our gap year volunteers in Zimbabwe, has written about how CAFOD is helping children living with disabilities:

Katy has seen how CAFOD supports children living with disabilities in Zimbabwe

Katy has seen how CAFOD supports children living with disabilities in Zimbabwe

Zimbabwe is a beautiful country with beautiful people. Everyone we have met over the past two weeks have been amazing, friendly and kind to those around them. We met these people at the previous partners we visited, Mavambo and Mashambanzou, and now also at St Albert’s, where we have been staying during the week.

On the second day of our stay with St Albert’s we visited the Chitemamuswe Rehabilitation Centre. This centre is for children, from babies to 19-year-olds, and is a place for those with disabilities to come and feel accepted and part of a community as some of their own communities may have rejected them due to their disability. The centre was set up by Mathew Chitemamuswe in 2013 to help people living with disabilities and with HIV and AIDS.

The centre’s work is split into three age groups. Mrs Savah runs the youngest age group, with the main aim to prepare the young children for when they start school, as they need to know how to cope with their disability without the technology or accessories that are available elsewhere. Continue reading

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Filed under Africa, CAFOD, Education

How far does your Gift Aid go?

Haoua Balma at St Augustine Health Centre, Niamey.

The Gift Aid on a £10 Fast Day donation – £2.50 – could pay for antibiotics at a health centre in Niger.

Grace Cowley coordinates CAFOD’s Lent Fast Day Appeal. Here she tells us why she’s so passionate about Gift Aid and the difference it makes to CAFOD’s partners around the world.

The Gift Aid system, which gives back tax to charities from donations from tax payers, has just turned 25 years old. You’ll have seen Gift Aid forms when making donations, but it may surprise you just how special this little form is.

“It might just be a drop in the ocean, but the ocean is made up of lots of drops.”  Evelina Manola, Caritas Hellas in Greece

In the past 25 years, CAFOD has received £42 million in Gift Aid. That money can be used for any project around the world, which means it can pay for work in places of great poverty, which perhaps aren’t in the headlines.

Find resources to start fundraising for Lent Fast Day 2016

This is the heart of why Gift Aid is brilliant – because it enables more people to overcome poverty and injustice. The Gift Aid on £1 – 25p – could buy enough rice to feed a family for a day after a natural disaster. The Gift Aid on a £10 Fast Day donation – £2.50 – could pay for antibiotics at a health centre in Niger. Continue reading

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Step into the Gap Peru – Fiona sees the Year of Mercy in action

Fiona has written from her Step into the Gap visit to Peru about how she is seeing the corporal acts of mercy in action in CAFOD’s work:

Fiona at Lake Paró​​n

Fiona at Lake Paró​​n

During this Year of Mercy, we are called to act upon the corporal and spiritual acts of mercy. And so, while in Peru, I’ve been reflecting on the corporal acts in particular. It seems that they don’t need to be taken literally, as I’d first thought. I thought I’d take this time to focus on CAFOD partner CEAS who we’ve had the privilege of spending time with during this trip. They are the organisation for social action set up by the Peruvian Bishops’ Conference.

Learn more about the Year of Mercy

‘Welcome the stranger’

Of all the corporal acts of mercy, I find that ‘welcoming the stranger’ is a ​​particularly challenging one. It’s God’s call for us to put the faith and trust we have in Him into a complete stranger’s hands. It can be difficult to open our hearts—let alone our homes—to people that we know nothing about. Still, families have been doing just that—and more!—for us gap year volunteers here in Peru. The relationship built between CAFOD partners such as CEAS and the local community has enabled this faith and trust to exist.

‘To clothe the naked’ Continue reading

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Filed under CAFOD, Latin America and Carribean, Prayer, Water

Youth leaders: Hannah reflects on the European refugee crisis

Hannah Remm is a youth worker at The Briars, the residential youth centre for the Diocese of Nottingham. Over the past year Hannah has been involved with CAFOD’s ambassador scheme, and recently she gathered with other youth leaders to spend time reflecting on the current refugee crisis and CAFOD’s response in Syria and Europe.

hannah thumbnail

Hannah is a member of the Briars youth team in Nottingham diocese

As a part of our CAFOD Ambassadors scheme, we a day at the CAFOD office at Romero House discussing the topic of refugees. We looked at the language we associate with refugees, the stories that we had heard in the news and on social media along with other information about the European refugee crisis. Some of the things discussed did shock me a little, especially when we looked at how often the media portrays refugees in in a dehumanising way, such as the refugees in Calais living in ‘The Jungle’ camp, or politicians referring to them arriving in ‘swarms’. As a group we realised that the language we use is so important. Refugees are still people – people with families, emotions, hope and dreams just like us. Continue reading

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Filed under CAFOD, Emergency, Middle East, Refugees, Youth resources

Lost Family Portraits: meeting Souraya’s family

Nana Anto-Awuakye is CAFOD’s World News Manager. She recently met families living in the Bekka refugee camp in Lebanon as part of CAFOD’s Lost Family Portaits project.

Nana with young refugee children

Nana playing with some of the young children at Bekka refugee camp

Last Christmas, various family members snapped away on their latest mobile phone cameras, and we all dutifully posed for the camera. I asked for the unflattering photos of me to be deleted, my sister refused saying, “It’s Christmas, and we are all together.”

Only a few weeks earlier I was in Lebanon’s Bekka valley, just nine kilometres from the Syrian border. I was working with our partner Caritas Lebanon Migrant Centre, the photographer Dario Mitidieri, and the creative agency M&C Saatchi to photograph family portraits of Syrian refugees inside some of the informal camp settlements in the Bekka.

See the Lost Family Portraits

Our arrival with the photography crew creates an air of excitement, as children run out from the labyrinth pathways in between the tented dwellings, as if the Pied Piper were calling them.

The camp leader, or ‘Chawish’ tells me: “Every family here has someone missing; they are either dead, kidnapped, or trapped.”

Continue reading

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